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Did You Know Last Night’s Super Bowl was Played inside an Energy-Efficient Stadium?


2/3/2014 10:00 AM

Yes, you read that correctly.

Sunday’s Super Bowl XLVIII was played at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, and although 1.2 million square feet larger than the Meadowlands (the original Giants/Jets Stadium) it consumes 30% less energy. During its construction, several energy-saving technologies were incorporated including a solar installation, water-efficient plumbing, LEDs (light-emitting diodes), and an automated lighting control system.

According to Allen Hershkowitz, director of the Natural Resources Defense Council’s Sports Greening Project and co-founder of the Green Sports Alliance, only 13% of Americans follow science news while 61% consider themselves sports fans. It could be assumed that many fans are unaware of how energy-efficient their favorite sports complexes and stadiums can be.

There are several football stadiums striving to use less energy. A few are highlighted below.

Centurylink Field, Seattle Seahawks:
Technology upgrades installed since the field opened in 2002 have reduced annual energy consumption by 21%. Energy efficiency initiatives include point-of-use lighting controls, low-flow water fixtures, easy access to public transportation, and electric vehicle charging stations.
Georgia Dome, Atlanta Falcons:
During a 2009 renovation, the Georgia Dome included several upgrades to decrease energy use including an automated control system for the HVAC system and incorporating fluorescent and metal halide lighting.
Levi’s Stadium, San Francisco 49ers:
The new stadium, scheduled to open for the 2014 season, includes a 400kW solar panel system, as well as a “green roof,” building control systems, and water-conserving plumbing fixtures.
Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia Eagles:
Since 2003, the stadium has reduced its electricity consumption by 33% through energy conservation programs. The stadium is slated to receive a solar installation and several wind turbines. Increased monitoring and management of energy use also helped decreased consumption.
Soldier Field, Chicago Bears:
While it’s one of the oldest NFL stadiums in the nation (opened in 1924), it is the only one to receive a LEED–EB certification. Its renovations include adding electric vehicle charging stations and using LEDs to light the field.

Are you a fan of science and sports now?