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Code Alert: South Carolina, 29 April 2010



Reprinted From E-mail Announcement from the South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation

On March 22, 2010, in compliance with Section 6-9-50(A) of the South Carolina Code of Laws, 1976 as amended, the South Carolina Building Codes Council (BCC) formally adopted the following construction related codes for mandatory enforcement by all jurisdictions within the state. The mandatory codes and the dates they must be implemented are the:

2009 International Building Code with modifications, no appendixes, January 1, 2011;

2009 International Residential Code with modifications, no appendixes, January 1, 2011;

2009 International Fire Code with modifications, no appendixes, January 1, 2011;

2009 International Plumbing Code, unmodified, no appendixes, January 1, 2011;

2009 International Mechanical Code, unmodified, no appendixes, January 1, 2011; and,

2009 International Fuel Gas Code with modifications, no appendixes, January 1, 2011.

The modifications adopted for the Building, Residential, Fire and Fuel Gas Codes accompany, and are made part of this notice.

No appendixes for any of the codes listed above were adopted by the BCC and cannot be adopted or used locally.

All local jurisdictions must use only the codes and modifications approved by the BCC. Local modifications to the mandatory codes are not valid unless approved by the BCC and the local governing body prior to implementation.

As permitted by Section 6-9-60 of the South Carolina Code of Laws, 1976 as amended, “permissive codes” may be used as needed by a local jurisdiction, but the codes must first be adopted by ordinance before enforcement can begin. The permissive codes are the:

2009 International Property Maintenance Code;

2009 International Existing Building Code; and,

2009 International Performance Code for Buildings and Facilities.

Of special interest to the electrical industry, the following three amendments were adopted by the South Carolina Building Code Council for enforcement regarding the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC). South Carolina utilizes Chapters 33-42 of the IRC for all 1 and 2 Family Dwelling electrical installations.

Modification Number: IRC 2009 13.

Section: E3901.11 HVAC outlet.

Modification: Language was added in the first sentence to establish that the required convenience receptacle is to be installed when HVAC and refrigeration equipment is located in an attic or crawl space.

The modified section now reads: “A 125-volt, single-phase, 15 or 20 ampere-rated receptacle outlet shall be installed at an accessible location for the servicing of heating, air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment located in attics and crawl spaces. The receptacle shall be located on the same level and within 25 feet (7620 mm) of the heating, air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The receptacle outlet shall not be connected to the load side of the HVAC equipment disconnecting means.”

Reason: The purpose for the convenience receptacle is to provide a technician with power in an attic or crawl space where receptacles are not typically available.

Note: Continued modification IRC 2006 31. In the 2009 edition of the IRC, the section number was changed from E3801.11 to E3901.11.

Proponent: Home Builders Association of South Carolina.

Effective Date: July 1, 2008.

Modification Number: IRC 2009 14.

Section: E3902.11 Arc-fault circuit-interrupter protection.

Modification: An exception was added to the section.

The exception reads “Exception: Arc-fault circuit interrupter protection is not required for outlets used solely for smoke and/or fire detection devices.”

Reason: A smoke detector is a dormant electrical load that is only activated when there is smoke present. The possibility of an arc-fault situation being created by a smoke detector is infinitesimal and arc-fault devices have not proven themselves to be reliable enough to have a life safety device such as the smoke detector dependent on their proper operation.

Note: Continued modification IRC 2006 32. In the 2009 edition of the IRC, the section number was changed from E3802.12 to E3902.11.

Proponent: Home Builders Association of South Carolina.

Effective Date: July 1, 2008.

Modification Number: IRC 2009 15.

Section: E4002.14 Tamper-resistant receptacles.

Modification: The section was deleted and replaced with new language.

The new section now reads: “Tamper-Resistant Receptacles in Dwelling Units. In all areas specified in 210.52 (National Electrical Code) all nonlocking type 125-volt, 15-and 20-ampere receptacles shall be listed tamper-resistant receptacles.

Exception No. 1: Receptacles located more than 1.7 m (5½ ft) above floor.

Exception No. 2: Receptacles that are part of a luminaire or appliance.

Exception No. 3: A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that in normal use is not easily moved from one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)(7), or (A)(8) (National Electrical Code).”

Reason: To incorporate language proposed for the 2011 National Electrical Code.

Proponent: Home Builders Association of South Carolina.

Effective Date: January 1, 2011.

Contact: john.minick@nema.org